Bronx

Monroe College's Bronx campus is an ideal urban campus located in the bustling Fordham section.

New Rochelle

Located in downtown New Rochelle, the Monroe College New Rochelle campus is nestled in a diverse, thriving suburban community in Westchester County.

St. Lucia

The scenic Monroe College St. Lucia campus in Barnard Hill Castries on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia combines the best of many worlds.

Queens Ext. Site

Monroe's Queens Extension Site is located in the heart of downtown Flushing, a vibrant and ethnically mixed district of Queens.

  • Monroe College History

    For more than eight decades, Monroe College has remained true to its community of students by providing them with every opportunity for academic and career success. The focus has steadfastly remained on delivering a practical education together with the skills required to adapt to challenges in a rapidly changing world. The following includes milestones from the College’s early days in the 1930s to the present:

    Monroe originated in 1933 under the guidance of teacher Mildred King on Boston Post Road in the West Farms section of the Bronx. Named for U.S. President James Monroe, it began as the “Monroe School of Business,” consisting of just four small classrooms and seven students.

    In 1936, Harry Jerome joined the school, bringing with him a similarly robust commitment to education. Before long, seven students became 145. Tuition was just $5 for an evening session and $10 for a week.

    By the end of World War II, Monroe found itself adapting to a new audience, including veterans and women who needed the skills to begin new jobs and find their place in a post-war society. Demand was keen for workers in the emerging field of data processing.  

    By 1966, the first computer arrived, prefacing an increase in the school's size and the 1967 opening of the Fordham Campus. The original Boston Post Road campus closed in 1977 while 1978 found a new president in Stephen Jerome.

    In 1983, Monroe celebrated its 50th anniversary with the opening of a branch campus in New Rochelle. This suburban campus in the heart of Westchester became an educational destination for county residents along with representation from over twenty states and an increasing number of international students.

    It was in 1998 that Monroe developed and offered its first distance learning courses on the Internet. By 2001 this program had grown to include 30 online courses with over 400 students registered. In addition, growth of Monroe's traditional programs led to expansions at both the Bronx and New Rochelle campuses.

    Now well into the 21st century and its ninth decade, Monroe is recognized as a leader in providing a focused, career-oriented, quality education. The ever evolving aspects of the business world present constant challenges to the College but these are challenges Monroe has faced head on.